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Avaya Hosts High School Girls for Behind-the-Scenes Look at theCommunications Technology of the FIFA Women's World Cup 2003 USA

10-06-2003
  • Supported by Women in Technology, girls tell the story in apresentation posted to Avaya's FIFA World Cup soccer Web site

Against the backdrop of the FIFA Women's World Cup 2003, Avaya Inc. (NYSE:AV) and Women In Technology (WIT) teamed to give a group of young women attending Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology (TJHSST) a behind-the-scenes look at the technology of the FIFA Women's World Cup.

Against the backdrop of the FIFA Women's World Cup 2003, Avaya Inc. (NYSE:AV) and Women In Technology (WIT) teamed to give a group of young women attending Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology (TJHSST) a behind-the-scenes look at the technology of the FIFA Women's World Cup. Avaya Inc, a leading global provider of communications networks and services for businesses, is an event sponsor and the Official Convergence Communications Provider for the FIFA Women's World Cup 2003, which is currently being played through October 12.

The project was designed to show the girls how communications technology enables the FIFA Women's World Cup soccer games to be reported through thousands of media outlets around the world. To tell the story of the month-long project, the young women have created a multimedia presentation of key learnings and impressions that is now live on the Avaya World Cup Soccer Web site at http://worldcup.avaya.com/wwc_2003.

Supported by WIT mentors and two faculty advisors from TJHSST, the girls learned about cutting-edge converged communications and networking  both wired and wireless  through visits to Avaya's Briefing and Demo Center in Herndon, Va., and a behind-the-scenes tour of RFK Stadium led by Doug Gardner, managing director of IT for the Avaya FIFA technical program. In addition, Avaya executives in various roles across the company  from research and development to product management, sales and engineering marketing  provided technical support for the project and shared career experiences and advice.

Avaya has provided extensive, converged voice and data networking for the six U.S. stadiums hosting the tournament, including RFK stadium in Washington, D.C. and for FIFA's U.S. headquarters in Long Beach, California.

"We are thrilled to work with Avaya to give the girls at Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology a behind-the-scenes look at the role technology plays in the Women's World Cup," said Marla Ozarowski, Chair of Girls in Technology, an outreach committee of the Washington, D.C. Metro area's Women in Technology organization. "In addition to seeing the technology first-hand, the girls are working closely with a group of women mentors from Women in Technology to complete their projects. It's an incredible addition to their daily curriculum at TJHSST, and we hope it continues to keep these girls excited and interested in technology."

The girls also learned about the demands of journalists to be both accurate and creative under the pressure of deadlines, as well as the requirements for security and accreditation connected with a large, global event. And, just so the girls learn about the importance of balancing work and play, they attended the FIFA Women's World Cup 2003 opening ceremonies and soccer match that were held at RFK stadium, where they were witness to the first of Team USA's wins in the 32-match tournament. The project culminated with a multimedia presentation created by the girls and now posted to Avaya's FIFA Women's World Cup 2003 Web site.

"I'm very excited about this opportunity to learn more about communications, especially from women who have had experience in this field," said Grace Chung, a senior at Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology. "We've seen what goes on behind the scenes at sports events and learned more about the technology that makes such fast communication possible."

For the FIFA Women's World Cup 2003, Avaya is providing voice and data networking and systems that will transmit real-time data directly from the field to an International Broadcast Center in New York, giving TV commentators data and graphics on each match. The same real-time data will feed www.fifaworldcup.com, the official Web site for the tournament, allowing fans and journalists to follow via PC or handheld device. Avaya is providing high-speed connectivity for the thousands of journalists attending the games, and for FIFA staff to manage accreditation and credentials for thousands of players, journalists, staff members and volunteers. Avaya Global Services is designing, building and managing the networks for the six stadiums and FIFA's U.S. headquarters in Long Beach, Calif.

About Avaya
Avaya Inc. designs, builds and manages communications networks for more than 1 million businesses worldwide, including 90 percent of the FORTUNE 500®. Focused on businesses large to small, Avaya is a world leader in secure and reliable Internet Protocol (IP) telephony systems and communications software applications and services.

Driving the convergence of voice and data communications with business applications  and distinguished by comprehensive worldwide services  Avaya helps customers leverage existing and new networks to achieve superior business results. For more information visit the Avaya Web site: http://www.avaya.com

About Women in Technology
Women in Technology (WIT) is a not for profit organization dedicated to offering women involved in all levels of the technology industry a wide range of professional development and networking opportunities. One of the organization's main goals is to create a forum where women in technology can be recognized and promoted as role models. WIT was founded in 1994 and has over 800 members. For more information, please visit WIT's Web site, www.womenintechnology.org.

About Girls in Technology
Girls in Technology, a sub-committee of WIT, supports academic and community programs that engage girls in technology and computer-related learning. This support can take many forms, such as scholarships, grants, mentoring and speaking engagements, program and curriculum development, seeking corporate funding and exploring other opportunities to expose school-age girls to technology. For more information, please visit GIT's Web site, www.girlsintechnology.org

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